Tag open source

Benefits and Risks in Curated Open Source

Today, Aerospike announced its in-memory NoSQL DBMS is available under the AGPL license, the same license used by a few of its competitors. According to Aerospike, there were a number of reasons to pursue an open source path, such as getting their DBMS into the hands of developers – who are the people leading the NoSQL charge. Of course, the long-term objective is some of those OSS users will eventually become paying customers.

The unexpected result is enterprises with open source mandates will be able to use Aerospike more broadly. As closed source software, Aerospike was a point solution. But the licensing change means Aerospike’s addressable use cases expand overnight.

This is a fundamental shift in enterprise attitudes toward open source and vendor lock-in.

During my career, I’ve seen open source software transition from a heretical notion to an essential factor in how enterprises evaluate and purchase software. This is especially true in the Information Management space. Information Management has a long history of understanding and adopting open source, essentially starting with Ingres and spawning a variety of data management options available today.

However, it takes more than simply having an Apache project or something on Github. Enterprises aren’t turning to StackOverflow, IRC or mailing lists for support. Open source software needs to be curated by commercializers for enterprises to be willing to use it.

It’s an interesting shift. Companies are directing – or outright owning – the development of open source projects to make them palatable to enterprises. In some cases, only one company is developing or shipping the open source project. That leads to an interesting question about the actual value of open source in that scenario: If only one company supports an open source product, is that product viable at avoiding vendor lock-in?

Let me know what you think in the comments.

Copyright © Nick Heudecker

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